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Glaciation
Glacial Erosion
Glacial Landforms - Upland Features
Glacial Landforms - Lowland features
Case Study - Helvellyn, Lake District
Photo gallery - Goat Fell, Isle of Arran

 

[image - arete]
An arete - a knife-edged ridge separating two corries
 

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Glacial Landforms - Upland Features
Upland glacial features include: Corrie - This is an arm chair shaped hollow found in the side of a mountain, e.g. Helvellyn, Lake District
[arete]
Arete - This is a narrow, knife edge ridge separating two corries, e.g. Striding Edge, Helvellyn.
[pyramidal peak]

Pyramidal Peaks - These are formed when three or more corries form in the side of one mountain, e.g. The Matterhorn, Switzerland or Mount Snowdon, Snowdonia National Park, Wales.

Tarn - This is a lake found in a corrie, e.g. Red Tarn, The LakeDistrict.

Glacial Landforms - Lowland Features
Lowland glacial features include:

U-shaped Valley - This a valley which was V-shaped but has been eroded by ice. The valley sides are steeper and the valley floor flatter after the ice melts. Hence the name U-shaped valleys.

The video below shows High Cup, a u-shaped valley in the North Pennines.

Truncated Spurs - These are spurs which have been cut through by ice, e.g. Nant Francon Valley, Snowdonia.

Hanging Valleys - These occur when glaciers at higher levels than the main valley didn't experience such powerful erosion. Tributary streams enter the valley as waterfalls from hanging valleys.

Ribbon Lakes - These are lakes found in U-shaped valleys, e.g. Lake Windermere, Lake District. Drumlins - These are hills shaped like eggs! (see diagram below).

[Drumlins diagram]

Drumlins are blunt at one end and tapered at the other. Drumlins are found in swarms called 'basket of eggs' topography. This is because they look like eggs in a basket! They are formed when ice is moving forward, but is also melting. The ice deposits boulder clay and till when it comes across a small obstacle (e.g. small rock outcrop). Most material is deposition the 'up stream' end of the drumlin. The down stream end is shaped by the ice.

Case Study - Helvellyn, Lake District
The following links are to web sites containing case study information about Helvellyn, an area containing glaciated landforms in the Lake District, England.

   


 
     

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